Health Testing Reviews for True Fit For Me

At a Glance

Editor's Rating:
4.5 out of 5 stars
Customer Service:
5 out of 5 stars
Clarity of Results:
4 out of 5 stars
References Cited:
4 out of 5 stars
Value for Money:
5 out of 5 stars

Summary

Overall, the True Fit For Me test provided an incredibly personalized look at my health and fitness. For me, the hightlight was definitely the opportunity to discuss my results and ask questions of Dr Kayser, who provided several insights and tailored recommendations about how to set and reach my own personal goals.

This consultation did come with a few drawbacks, including that without it, the report was a little difficult to interpret. It was also hard to note down absolutely everything Dr Kayser told me, meaning that even when I went back through it there were a couple things that I was still a bit unsure about. However, for me, the benefits more than made up for these minor issues and I would recommend this test to anyone looking for help in reaching their lifestyle goals.

Full Review

True Fit For Me is a company that offers a range of tests that aim to help customers better assess and improve their lifestyle, in order to reach their health objectives. These tests were developed from the TrueFit wellness clinic and sports medicine center, based in Tulsa, OK. The company was founded and continues to be run by Dr Michael Kayser, who works with a range of professionals, including nurses, aestheticians, and dieticians, in order to offer customers thorough and personalized health advice.

Product Expectations

True Fit For Me offered four different tests on their website, two of which were based purely on assessment of standard health markers, and two of which included DNA analysis. Since I was interested in the genetic results, I only considered the ‘DNA’ test and the ‘DNA & Wellness’ test. The main difference between the two seemed to be that the latter included assessment of my lipid levels, blood sugar and my risk of hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease as well as the diet and exercise genetic markers. I decided to go with this option, as it seemed that this would offer the most comprehensive evaluations and recommendations about my health.

Other than the list of what was included in the test, there wasn’t a lot of explanation about what the report would tell me or exactly which genes would be analyzed. However, I was able to see a sample report, which made it easier to understand the list of features I’d read before, and it was great to get an idea of how the results would be presented. There was also a section explaining what to expect from the meal planning service, which was also included with the results.

I was surprised that I was unable to find any terms and conditions or privacy policy on the website, which was a bit disconcerting, as I couldn’t be sure exactly what would happen to my DNA sample or data once the test had been conducted.

Ordering Experience

I purchased the test using PayPal. I also had the option to pay with PayPal Credit or by inputting my card details directly to the True Fit For Me website.

Once I’d completed the order process I received a confirmation email and the kit arrived a few days later. It came in a tube that contained not only the cheek swab to take my DNA sample, but a tape measure to take measurements of my height, neck, naval, waist and hips. This was easy to use, but I wasn’t sure exactly where to take the naval and waist measurements. Even after a Google search, I wasn’t able to work this out, so ended up just taking a guess.

I used these measurements to fill out part of a survey, which also included questions about health issues, age etc. All of these were easy to answer and took less than 10 minutes to complete.

I’m very squeamish about blood, but taking the sample was relatively easy and a lot less painful than I’d expected. The instructions provided were easy to follow and the only problem I had was getting enough blood to fill the circles on the card. There was advice on how to deal with this though and the whole process only took around 10 minutes, despite this issue.

I sent the samples back in a pre-paid envelope and received an email confirming that they had reached the lab a few days later.

The Results

About three weeks later, I received an email about organizing a call with Dr Kayser to discuss my results. Once I’d arranged this, I was sent my results as a PDF file. It was very similar to the sample I’d seen on the website, so I already felt familiar with the format.

The first part of the report went over the information relating to my current physical condition, according to the information I’d provided and the results of the analysis of my blood samples. It also included the advice on how to change my diet and exercise routines. The second part went over the specific results of my genetic analysis.

Results Section: Call with Dr Kayser

Looking over my report for the first time, there were several parts I didn’t fully understand, and I had quite a few questions. Luckily, I had my call with Dr Kayser planned for a couple of days after I received the results, and had been encouraged to note my questions down in advance.

The call itself was exceptionally helpful. I had only expected to have around 10-20 minutes to talk over the results, but Dr Kayser informed me at the beginning of the call that he’d set aside an hour.

He took me through each aspect of the report, explaining how they’d come to each conclusion and why they’d chosen to include each measurement and gene in the assessment, providing details of the scientific studies and calculations that had been used. I was able to ask questions at each stage and Dr Kayser explained that the point of the call was not only to help me to fully understand my report, but to further personalize my recommendations, according to my own lifestyle and health goals.

Following the call, I was sent an amended copy of my results that included notes and the updated recommendations that we’d discussed. I was really impressed and had not expected such a truly personalized experience

Results Section: Body Composition

The first part of the report looked at my body composition, which I’d been a bit confused about at first. It included values for ‘Weight’, ‘Percent Lean Mass’, ‘Body Fat Mass’ and ‘Percent Body Mass’ (shown below).

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My Body Composition Assessment.

My Body Composition Assessment.

I was pleased to see that my weight, percent lean mass and percent body mass were all within the recommended range. My body fat mass was below the recommended level, which surprised me, as I’m slim but not extremely so. When I spoke with Dr Kayser, he explained that the measurements I’d taken with the tape measure had been used to calculate these, so it may have been my confusion over the measurements that caused this to look so low.

Results Section: Macronutrient Plan

The next section provided advice on the relative amounts of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins I should be aiming to eat in my diet, displayed as a pie chart (shown below).

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My Macronutrient Plan pie chart.

My Macronutrient Plan pie chart.

Again, I hadn’t been sure how this had been worked out when first looking at my report, but Dr Kayser explained that my genetic results, had been put into an algorithm to calculate the ratios, starting with carbohydrates, then fats, and attributing what was left to protein.

I learnt that I carry genetic variants that are associated with a need to eat less carbohydrates than other macronutrients (which is a shame, considering my favorite foods are bread and pasta!). Both the report and Dr Kayser made clear that, in general, I should opt for high protein foods rather than carbohydrates or fats. I was given access to the 'Eat This Much' which helped to practically implement this by offering meal planning features and recipe suggestions.

Results Section: Caloric Intake

The ‘Caloric Intake’ section gave me further information and advice regarding my diet. Dr Kayser’s call was particularly helpful in clarifying these recommendations. Firstly, he explained that TDEE stood for ‘Total Daily Energy Expenditure’, which is an estimate of how many calories I burn throughout the day. This was accompanied by a recommended number of calories that I should be eating.

I was happy to see that my ‘TDEE’ and ‘Recommended’ values matched, meaning I was currently eating and exercising the right amount to maintain a healthy weight. Dr Kayser explained that the number shown was what had been calculated by the algorithm, but it could be altered according to whether someone wanted to lose or gain weight.

The section went on to show the amount in calories and grams that I should be eating of each macronutrient, which was a useful addition to the information provided in the pie chart.

Results Section: Exercise Plan

The diet recommendations were followed by a section on exercise (shown below).

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My Exercise Plan.

My Exercise Plan.

The most prominent part of this section was my ‘Max Heart Rate’. I was again confused about what exactly this meant before speaking with Dr Kayser. He explained that it was not the heart rate I should be aiming for when exercising, but the maximum I should push myself to.

The rest of the section provided advice on how much and what types of exercise I should be aiming to do. Again, this became a lot more meaningful when speaking with Dr Kayser, who asked me about my current level of fitness and my goals. He used this information to provide me with a heartrate to aim for when exercising (152bpm). I found this really useful as although I always record the time and distance I run, I hadn’t realized heartrate was such an important factor and, therefore, hadn’t even considered what rate to aim for.

Results Section: Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar, and Lipid Panel

My blood pressure results were based on the information I had provided, so I wasn’t surprised to read that my blood pressure was within the recommended levels. It was good to see that this meant my eight-year hypertension risk was the same as the optimal risk and a lot lower than average. This said, and as Dr Kayser pointed out, this is probably largely due to my age (I’m only in my 20s), so I shouldn’t get complacent.

I was a bit worried to see that my blood sugar was a bit lower than the recommended levels, but was reassured by Dr Kayser, who explained that this could be due to the time between me taking the sample and it reaching the lab (I hadn’t posted it until about a week after taking the test).

Finally, my lipid levels had been assessed and had looked at two types of cholesterol (LDL and HDL) and triglycerides. I wasn’t sure exactly what these were but Dr Kayser once again explained. It showed that my LDL levels were normal (again, unsurprising because of my age) and that my HDL levels were slightly below recommended levels. Dr Kayser reassured me that this wasn’t low enough to worry about.

Results Section: Genetic Markers

The final section of the report went through the genetic results themselves, with more specific recommendations related to each result. It was sorted into three sub-sections: ‘Nutrition and Diet’, ‘Supplements’ and ‘Fitness and Exercise’. There was a useful key at the top of the page (shown below) and Dr Kayser explained that they had chosen to use blue and green rather than red and green, as the results showed whether the genetic variant indicated an average or elevated risk rather than being good and bad.

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The key for my genetic results.

The key for my genetic results.

The Nutrition and Diet sub-section was the first, and included seven results. Despite my first result indicating that I was less likely to be obese and suffer from metabolic syndrome, the rest of the results in this sub-section showed that I carried at least one, and sometimes two copies of the elevated risk variants. This generally meant I was more likely than average to be overweight, according to my genetics. This made me think about trying to set up good habits now so that as I get older and my metabolism slows, I can continue to overcome this genetic disadvantage.

The second section was based on supplements. I’ve never really considered taking supplements and wasn’t particularly interested in doing so. Therefore, I appreciated that when I told Dr Kayser this, he didn’t push me to change my mind. He still explained the results thoroughly though and I was happy to hear that there wasn’t really any need for me to take supplements anyway, according to my DNA, as I only had one copy of an elevated risk variant out of the six possible.

The final part of the genetic results was related to fitness traits. Three of the four results are shown below.

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Three of my Fitness and Exercise genetic results.

Three of my Fitness and Exercise genetic results.

Each of these was accompanied by an explanation and recommendations. I noticed that a couple of the results were the same as those in the nutrition section, including the one that suggested I was less likely to be obese and suffer from metabolic syndrome.

Unfortunately, the results specific only to fitness bought more bad news for my prospects of maintaining a healthy weight, as I’m genetically likely to have to work harder to lose weight from exercise. However, there was useful advice on the types of activities to try in order to get the best results from working out.

Summary

Overall, the True Fit For Me test provided an incredibly personalized look at my health and fitness. For me, the hightlight was definitely the opportunity to discuss my results and ask questions of Dr Kayser, who provided several insights and tailored recommendations about how to set and reach my own personal goals.

This consultation did come with a few drawbacks, including that without it, the report was a little difficult to interpret. It was also hard to note down absolutely everything Dr Kayser told me, meaning that even when I went back through it there were a couple things that I was still a bit unsure about. However, for me, the benefits more than made up for these minor issues and I would recommend this test to anyone looking for help in reaching their lifestyle goals.

Please note that we were invited to take this test free of charge.

See a description of this DNA test from True Fit For Me >