Health Testing Reviews for LifeNome

Prices start at £41.99

At a Glance

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Summary

I really enjoyed the LifeNome reports and would recommend them to anyone wanting to explore their genetic health and personality. I felt that the way in which the information was presented was very effective and helped me to navigate the reports with ease. The reports allowed me to quickly assess the variety of results, but also provided enough extra details and resources to help me explore specific results further.

The explanations, references and recommendations added even more value to the results and I came away feeling that I’d not only gotten an insight into several aspects of my own health and personality, but into a wide range of other areas as well.

Full Review

LifeNome offers a variety of personalised wellness reports, based on 23andMe, Family Tree DNA, Helix or Ancestry DNA data. Headed up by Dr Raya Khanin and Dr Ali Mostashari, both of whom have several peer-reviewed academic papers to their name, the service offers reports that provide information on topics ranging from personality to skincare. It includes analysis of over 8000 genetic variants and reports on more than 150 traits, so I was excited to see what I would find out.

Product expectations

The LifeNome website offered lots of information about the reports on offer. I learned that I could use existing data I already had from a DNA test taken with either 23andMe, Family Tree DNA, Ancestry.com or Helix. There was also the choice to order a test with LifeNome (though from a third party) for those without data. There were six report options available: NutriNome, which would provide information relating to nutrition; FitNome, which was about fitness and training; SkinNome would tell me about my skin; AllergeNome, about allergies and sensitivities; PersoNome, to learn about my genetic personality traits and Total Insights, which included all of the previous reports for 20% less than if buying them all separately.

For each report, there was information about how many traits were included, how many pages the report would consist of and the main areas that the results would cover. I also learned that I’d be able to view my results online on both desktop and mobile, or could download them as a PDF file.

It was made clear that the results and recommendations shouldn’t be used in place of medical advice.

Ordering Experience

I chose to order the ‘Total Insights’ package, which included all of the reports available from LifeNome in one package. The process of ordering was pretty straightforward – I supplied details, including my name, my email address and my billing address, and was given the option to either pay by credit card or PayPal. Once I’d paid, I received a confirmation email and was able to upload my data. I was given the option to connect directly to 23andMe or to upload a Family Tree DNA/Ancestry DNA file from my computer. I noticed there was no option for Helix files even though they had been mentioned as an option on the website, but I was using 23andMe data so this wasn’t a problem that affected me.

My data took less than a minute to upload and I could then access my reports immediately.

Results section

My results were organised into the five different reports: NutriNome, FitNome, SkinNome, AllergeNome and PersoNome. The homepage is shown below.

The homepage showing each of my reports.

The homepage showing each of my reports.

Each of these reports was split into further sub-categories, referred to as ‘Detailed Reports’.

Results section: NutriNome

I chose to look at the NutriNome report first. A part of the summary page is shown below.

My NutriNome Report Summary Page.

My NutriNome Report Summary Page.

The NutriNome report was sub-categorised into ‘Diet and Metabolism’, ‘Minerals’ and ‘Vitamins’. I was also given the option to download my NutriNome report as a PDF, but I chose to look at the results online, via the different sections.

In the Diet and Metabolism section I found out that I was likely to respond particularly well to a low-carb and low-fat diet, and that I was expected to be quite sensitive to bitter tastes, neither of which came as a huge surprise. What was really interesting though, was the link to the latter of these results to the fact that I was genetically predisposed to eat less vegetables (I wish I’d had this evidence for when my mum tried to make me eat my sprouts as a child!).

I was surprised to learn that this was the case for 85% of the population. I then clicked to see more detail about my result. A section of it is shown below.

A more detailed look at my ‘Low Vegetable Intake’ result.

A more detailed look at my ‘Low Vegetable Intake’ result.

In addition to the result that revealed I was likely to eat a low amount of vegetables, the number of variants this was based on, an overview of what was meant by ‘low vegetable intake’ and my personal assessment was included. I was particularly impressed by a ‘Take Action’ button that led me to practical recommendations on how to enjoy vegetables more, in order to increase my intake. There was also a ‘Learn More’ button that directed me towards the exact genetic variants that had been analysed to come to this conclusion, which were hyperlinked to an external site that gave more information about them and detailed relevant peer-reviewed journal articles. Additional links to relevant magazine and website articles provided me with alternative, more easily digestible information about the scientific evidence supporting my results.

This section included 22 results, and the others included slightly less with 12 (Vitamins) and 16 (Minerals), but this added up to 50 in total, just for the NutriNome report! I was impressed that despite how numerous the results were, they were organised in a way that was easy to go through and which provided just enough information to be useful, without becoming overwhelming.

Results section: FitNome

After going through my NutriNome results, I moved on to look at my FitNome ones. This report was split into four sections: ‘Fitness Benefits’, ‘Fitness Profile’, ‘Injury Potential’ and ‘Muscle Characteristics’. I decided to look at the PDF version of this report and found the option to do this on the FitNome summary page.

I’d expected the PDF to be pretty much the same as the online version, but was pleasantly surprised to see that it had its own, more formal layout, which included a front cover and contents page. Another difference to online version was a summary of genetic predispositions which was sorted into ‘My Good Genes’ and ‘My Risky Genes’ (shown below).

The summary of my FitNome genetic predispositions.

The summary of my FitNome genetic predispositions.

I really liked how even when two results were both classified in the same way they didn’t necessarily show as exactly the same on the scale. ‘Aerobic performance’ and ‘Exercise Benefits for Blood Pressure’, for example, were both classified as ‘Slightly Advantaged’ but showed at different levels on the scale.

I also found it really interesting to learn that my aversion to exercise was genetically high, as although I’m quite fit and enjoy sport when I do it, I’ve always felt it’s something I’ve had to push myself to do.

Not all of the results included in the report were in this summary, and the report went on to give details about other aspects of fitness, such as my risk of stress fractures, which I was at a slightly elevated risk of. These more detailed sections were very similar to the online version and I particularly appreciated the specific and practical recommendations that accompanied each result, as had been the case with the NutriNome report.

Results section: SkinNome

The third report was ‘SkinNome’ which provided information categorised into the following sub-categories: ‘Skin and Aging’, ‘Skin and The Environment’, ‘Skin and The Sun’ and ‘Skin Profile’.

The layout of this report was pretty much the same as the previous two. I was surprised by how many different and specific results there were, for example ‘sagging eyelids risk’ (which I was glad to find out was a low risk for me). I hadn’t realised how many skin-related characteristics could be affected by my DNA!

I again appreciated the inclusion of several specific and easily implementable recommendations, especially as many of them were things I never would have thought of doing myself (eg. eating more garlic and onions to improve skin detoxification!).

Results section: AllergeNome

I was particularly interested in my AllergeNome results, as they were something I could directly compare to my own experiences. I feel that I’m quite unusual in how few allergies I have, so was intrigued to see if the results would reflect that.

The report was organised into the following sub-categories: ‘Food Allergies’, ‘Indoor Allergies’, ‘Outdoor Allergies’, ‘Sensitivity to Chemicals’ and ‘Other Sensitivities’. I looked first at the food allergies section, and was surprised to find that there were two separate results for ‘Allergy to Milk’ and ‘Lactose Intolerance’, the first of which I was at a low risk of, but the second of which I had only a slightly elevated risk of. This matched with what I know about myself, as I’ve never had any adverse reactions to milk or lactose-containing products

The difference between them was also really well explained. I learned that a milk allergy is related to problems in the immune system, whereas lactose intolerance is due to a ‘deficiency in the lactase enzyme’ that prevents the body from properly being able to digest foods containing lactose. I wasn’t entirely sure what an enzyme was, but in the context of the rest of the explanation it didn’t really matter.

The rest of the results were interesting as well. I found out that I was extra sensitive to benzene, which I had never heard of. Apparently, I’d most likely come into contact with this chemical through cigarettes, but luckily I don’t smoke. I was also pleased to find out that I had genetic variants associated with a slightly higher than average resistance to stomach flu! Overall, this was one of my favourite reports, as I felt that I’d not only learnt more about myself, but interesting general knowledge as well.

Results section: PersoNome

The last report I looked at was the PersoNome, which seemed a little different to the others, as it was less focused on physical health. It was sorted into the following sub-categories: ‘Interpersonal Characteristics’, ‘Learning Personality’ and ‘Personality Profile’. All of the sections had separate symbols which related to the different detailed reports, but I felt they were most useful in this section. The menu of the different sections and their symbols are shown below.

The ‘Detailed Reports’ for my PersoNome report.

The ‘Detailed Reports’ for my PersoNome report.

The symbols made it instantly clear which type of results would be included in each detailed report and added a memorable visual cue that helped when looking back for a specific result.

I found the Learning Personality section really interesting, especially the ‘Experiential Learning Impairment’ result. I had no idea what this meant before reading more about it, but found out I was at a slightly elevated risk. It was explained that this was to do with learning from mistakes, which, intriguingly, was also related to addictive behaviour. Apparently, those that have certain genetic variants are less likely to learn from mistakes and are also more likely, as a consequence, to display addictive behaviour. This was just one of several interesting personality traits included in this report and, as with the AllergeNome report, I felt that I had learnt more than just information about myself.

Summary

I really enjoyed the LifeNome reports and would recommend them to anyone wanting to explore their genetic health and personality. I felt that the way in which the information was presented was very effective and helped me to navigate the reports with ease. The reports allowed me to quickly assess the variety of results, but also provided enough extra details and resources to help me explore specific results further.

The explanations, references and recommendations added even more value to the results and I came away feeling that I’d not only gotten an insight into several aspects of my own health and personality, but into a wide range of other areas as well.

Click here to visit the LifeNome website to learn more about the types of DNA test they offer.

Index

  • Summary
  • Full Review
  • Product expectations
  • Ordering Experience
  • Results section
  • Results section: NutriNome
  • Results section: FitNome
  • Results section: SkinNome
  • Results section: AllergeNome
  • Results section: PersoNome
  • Summary