Health Testing Reviews for Gene Planet

From £219.37 Converted from €249.00

At a Glance

Editor's Rating:
5 out of 5 stars
Customer Service:
5 out of 5 stars
Clarity of Results:
5 out of 5 stars
References Cited:
5 out of 5 stars
Value for Money:
4.5 out of 5 stars

Summary

GenePlanet’s ‘NutriFit Premium’ report was an incredibly comprehensive, well-researched and painstakingly referenced report. It covered basically all aspects of nutrition, fitness, skin health, and general wellness with genetic bases that are currently known, without touching on any of the “scarier” results you may find in a genetic health report (such as predispositions to cancer, Alzheimer’s or heart disease).

The report was beautifully presented, and each result was explained in detail, with yet more information included in the appendices, should I wish to seek it out. The only drawback to such a comprehensive and detailed report was the trouble of remembering the many recommendations contained within it. Anyone looking to use the report as a nutrition guide would definitely have to take notes!

Full Review

GenePlanet was founded in 2008 by Marko Bitenc, the company’s CEO. Based in Slovenia, the company currently offers their genetic testing services in over 30 countries worldwide. Their team is made up of experts in biotechnology, pharmacy, medicine, biochemistry, bioinformatics and computer science.

Their reports focus on health, nutrition, and fitness, and are designed to help people adjust their lives in order to make the most of their genetics.

Product Expectations

I planned to take the ‘NutriFit Premium’ test, and so I went to the GenePlanet website to find out more about it. I found they offered three genetic tests: ‘NutriFit’, ‘NutriFit Premium’ and ‘HealthPlan’, a report covering disease predispositions and medication responses. There was also ‘NutriPlan’, a DNA-personalised cookbook that could be bought in conjunction with either of the NutriFit products.

I read that the NutriFit report was a 30-in-1 test covering multiple areas in nutrition, metabolic properties, exercise and general health, along with a tailored diet and lifestyle plan.

NutriFit Premium went a bit further, including more in-depth nutrition, health and lifestyle reports, in addition to specialised lifestyle and detoxification reports, and a rejuvenation report covering six areas, which would be focussed on skin health.

I would take the DNA test using a cheek swab, which I could return to the lab using a prepaid, pre-labelled envelope. Once my reports were ready, I’d receive an email.

Ordering Experience

The ordering process was pretty simple. Once I’d added the test to my cart, I could check out using my name, postal address, email, and phone number. For payment method, I could pay using a bank transfer, PayPal, or with a credit card through Skrill. Before I could submit my order, I had to agree to the Terms and Conditions, and so I took a look through these.

In the Terms and Conditions, I found I could request a refund before getting my results, though I may have to pay postage and administrative fees.

In the Privacy Policy, I was pleased to see that the company was GDPR compliant, and that I would be able to manage and delete my personal data. Once my sample had been analysed in the lab, it would be destroyed after 90 days. My DNA data may be used for aggregated research, meaning that it would be studied as part of a large data pool to increase anonymity. It would also be used to help improve their DNA testing services.

My personal and genetic information would not be shared with third-parties without my consent, except if necessary to comply with the law. However, I could request its deletion, and I read that my genetic information would be deleted in its entirety within 60 days of submitting the request.

I received my kit within a few days. It resembled the one I’d seen pictured on the site, and the cheek swab sample was quick and easy to take. I had to register my kit online before returning, and could create an account using an email address and password. The postage had already been paid for, and I returned my sample using a DHL courier and the prepaid invoice provided.

About a month after returning my kit, I received an email telling me my results were ready.

The Results

My results email contained a link to my online GenePlanet account, where I could log in with the email and password I’d used to register. Once I’d logged in, there was a link to download my report.

My report came in a PDF file, and was an impressive 147 pages! It included an introduction, which explained some of the DNA analysis process, and reassured me that the report did not contain any disease-related diagnoses. The GenePlanet team advised me to follow the recommendations in my report in order to make the best of my genetic potential.

My results were broken down into many sections, starting with an “Analysis Overview”, which showed my results in brief over several tables.

This was followed by a guide for reading and understanding my results, which I thought would be useful for anyone unfamiliar with genetics who hasn’t taken this kind of test before.

It also explained the benefits of nutrigenetics and the importance of good nutrition. For people just getting started on watching their diet and improving their health, there was plenty of information, which increased the user-friendliness of the experience.

Results: Diet & Weight

In the introduction to the section on “The Influence of Diet on Body Weight”, they cited a study conducted by Stanford University, which found that people on a diet chosen for their genetic type lost four kilograms more on average than those who followed a more generic diet. So far, I was onboard.

Looking through my results for this section, it seemed my genes weren’t exactly on my side! I found I was genetically more likely to regain lost weight. And though I had only an average risk for being overweight, I had an “unfavourable response” both to saturated fats and carbohydrates, though coupled with a favourable response to polyunsaturated fats, and a normal response to monounsaturated fats.

In the information, I discovered it was a variation in my ADIPOQ gene that made me more likely to regain lost weight. But I read that my genotype – GG – was actually more common than the rarer genotype (which only 20% of people have) that makes people more likely to be successful in avoiding “yo-yo” dieting.

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My result for “Weight Loss-Regain”.

My result for “Weight Loss-Regain”.

They recommended not to follow a too-restrictive diet, as this would lead to failure. I should try to develop healthy eating habits I could still follow after reaching my desired weight.

For my risk of being overweight, I had been given an average result, since I have “an approximately equal number of unfavourable and favourable variants of genes”. I saw I could find a list of the genes analysed in the “Analysed Genes” chapter, and so I scrolled down to have a look.

They’d analysed ten different genes to reach my result. For each gene, they had given the name, which analysis it had been used for (e.g. “Risk for being overweight”), the role of the gene (the FTO gene, for example, was described as “A gene that determines the development of excess body weight”), and which genotype I had (e.g. “AT”). For people curious about which gene versions they have, or who want to do their own research, this section was invaluable.

Next, I looked at my results for responses to different fats. My response to saturated fats was “unfavourable”, and I read that the risk variant in the APOA2 gene (which I had two copies of) gave carriers a two times higher risk of being overweight than those without it.

It was recommended I watch my consumption of animal fats, and avoid using coconut or palm oil.

I could receive a “normal” benefit from monounsaturated fats, which are found in various nuts and seeds, as well as olive oil. I read that we need monounsaturated fats for energy, growth and development, and to preserve the functioning of the heart and nervous system.

My response to polyunsaturated fats was favourable, and so I didn’t need to significantly increase my intake, though I read that this type of fat – found in rapeseed, flaxseed and pumpkin seed oil – is needed for similar reasons to monosaturated fats, and that it can reduce “bad” LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and increase “good” HDL cholesterol.

Lastly, I had an unfavourable to carbohydrates, since my version of the KCTD10 gene made me three times more susceptible to becoming overweight from eating too much of them. Still, I read that carbohydrates are needed as a source of energy, and for building bone and cartilage. Deprivation would lead to malnourishment, bad mood, and a decrease of body and muscle mass. Though I should take care to limit my intake of carbohydrates, I shouldn’t eliminate them entirely.

Results: Diet & Nutrition

For my Diet Type, it was recommended I follow a diet with a low intake of saturated fats, and a controlled intake of carbohydrates. There was also a chart showing my optimal calorie intake for my genetic type, which varied according to age and activity level.

I was also given recommended percentages of what my daily intake of carbohydrates, proteins, and saturated, polyunsaturated and monosaturated fats should be.

I had a personalised nutrition plan, which was comprehensive and mostly contained reasonable, sensible and actionable recommendations, though I did take issue with their advice that I shouldn’t consume meat more than three times a week! This would help reduce my intake of saturated fats, but I – not a vegetarian by any means – was convinced I’d quickly starve to death on such a diet.

One recommendation I really liked was that I eat five meals a day: breakfast, morning snack, lunch, afternoon snack and dinner. I have a fast metabolism and get hungry quickly, and so I was definitely on board with this! Other recommendations included substituting sweet treats with fruit, and going for complex carbohydrates over simple ones.

Results: Nutrients

In the “Requirement of Nutrients” section, I found a list of my predispositions to higher or lower levels of certain vitamins and nutrients, and recommendations for how I could get enough of them in my diet.

Again, I didn’t seem to have the most favourable genes. The results were colour-coded, and about half of mine were in the red, some were in yellow, and only one was in green.

For vitamins B6 and D, zinc, and “Bone Density” (which for some reason was included in this section), I had average requirements. For B9, I found I was inclined to higher levels than some people. For vitamin B12, iron, sodium, and potassium my results were in red, meaning I was inclined to lower levels of these nutrients (except in the case of sodium, which my genetic makeup may respond unfavourably to).

This section was broken down in a similar way to the section on “The Influence of Diet on Body Weight”, which broke down my body’s responses to the different macronutrients (i.e. carbohydrate, fats, etc.), while this section evaluated my responses to different micronutrients (i.e. vitamins and minerals). Again, there were explanations of why I needed these different nutrients, and which foods I could find them in.

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My nutrient requirement result for vitamin B6.

My nutrient requirement result for vitamin B6.

As you can see, I was predicted to have an average level of B6, and it was recommended I consume 1600 mcg of vitamin B6 daily. The vitamin could be found in lamb, turkey, mackerel, broccoli, bananas, and other foods.

For my result for sodium (salt), I read that excessive sodium intake is bad for the heart as it increases blood pressure. For people with my genetic makeup, this unfavourable response to sodium is increased, and so I should try to limit my intake.

Looking at my “Bone Density” result, I discovered that I had both favourable and unfavourable genetic variants, and so my bone strength had been predicted as average. It was recommended I take care to consume plenty of calcium, magnesium, and vitamins D, C and K, which would help to promote healthy bones.

Results: Eating Habits

In the “Eating Habits” section I learned that I was genetically less likely to opt for sweet treats, though I had a higher tendency for insatiability, since I have one unfavourable and one favourable variant in my FTO gene. This meant I should find it twice as hard to reach the feeling of satiety compared to people with purely favourable variants in their FTO gene (shown below).

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My result for "Satiety and Hunger".

My result for "Satiety and Hunger".

I also read that I have two favourable variants in the NMB gene, which meant that I experience normal feelings of hunger, which sounded about right; I was less sure about my result for insatiability, since I get full quite easily.

As well as having a lower tendency to go for sweet treats, I also discovered that my copy of the SLC2A2 gene gives me a more intense perception of sweet tastes. This wasn’t an unusual result: I learned that 73% of people have this version of the gene, and so it is the people who find sweetness less intense – and who are more likely to eat sweeter foods – that are in the minority.

I was also among the few people who were more likely to detect bitter tastes, since I carry one rare variant of the TAS2R38 gene associated with the ability to taste PROP, a chemical similar to the bitter tastes found in broccoli, olives, tonic water and coffee. Both these taste results seemed fitting, since I can’t stand too-sweet foods, and am not particularly fond of bitter tastes.

Results: Metabolic Properties

The metabolic properties section covered how my metabolism handled alcohol, caffeine, lactose and gluten. This section was mostly good news for me. I found my alcohol metabolism was slightly reduced due to a defect in my ADH1 gene. However, the two variants examined in my ALDH2 gene – also associated with alcohol metabolism – were both favourable.

I saw I have a rapid caffeine metabolism, which explained why caffeine has always had little or no effect on me. All the same, they recommended I have no more than two cups of coffee a day!

My lactose metabolism was also effective. Though I had one favourable and one unfavourable variant in my MCM6 gene, I should still produce enough of the lactase enzyme to break up the lactose in milk.

Similarly, I was unlikely to have any problems metabolising gluten. I was surprised to read that there is actually no evidence that a gluten-free diet is beneficial for people who do not have a gluten-related disorder (such as celiac disease, wheat allergy or non-celiac gluten sensitivity).

I also read that the genes indicating gluten intolerance are only found in 50% of people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and so it was still possible for someone with my genetic result to be gluten intolerant (which I, fortunately, am not).

Results: Detoxification

In the “Detoxification of Your Body” section, I discovered that my body doesn’t actually produce the enzyme quinone oxidoreductase, and that I have a reduced activity of the enzyme catalase, meaning that my body is less effective in breaking down free radicals, giving me a higher genetic exposure to oxidative stress.

I read that harmful free radicals are caused by radiation, cigarette smoke, various pollutants and certain other substances that the body can detoxify through enzymes. In order to improve my body’s ability to detoxify, it was recommended I consume plenty of selenium, vitamins C and E, coenzyme Q10, beta carotene and flavonoids, and avoid smoking.

My results showed I have genetically average levels of vitamin E, an antioxidant. Wheat sprouts, almonds, hazelnuts and broad beans were among the foods recommended for me.

I was disposed to higher levels of selenium: a mineral I’d never heard of before. I read that it is found in cereals, fish and meat, and that it is also an antioxidant. I was also predisposed to high levels of vitamin C, another antioxidant found in turnips, cabbage, peas, strawberries, guava, pineapple, and many other fruits and vegetables.

Results: Sports & Recreation

The first result in the “Sports and Recreation” section was “Muscle Structure”, which would tell me whether I’m better disposed to strength or endurance training. I found I was genetically better disposed to endurance training, such as long-distance running, aerobics, cycling, swimming, climbing, and hiking. I don’t have great aerobic abilities, so long-distance running didn’t sound right, but swimming, climbing and cycling were more up my street.

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My result for “Muscle Structure”.

My result for “Muscle Structure”.

Amongst my other sport-related results, I found that I had the “Fat Burning Gene”, meaning I could burn fat through cardio activities twice as easily as people without the gene. However, I had a less favourable gene associated with soft tissue injury risk, which increased the likelihood of incurring a soft tissue injury during exercise, and so they recommended that I always warm up properly, especially in cold environments.

I also discovered, to no great surprise of mine, that I have a genetically lower aerobic potential, and lower heart capacity, meaning I’m likely to get out of breath more easily, though I could still work on improving both through exercise.

My post-exercise recovery was predicted to be average, which sounded fine to me since I’ve never noticed that it was particularly quick or slow!

There was also a result for the “Warrior” gene, which is a bit more to do with personality than exercise. However, those with the Warrior version of the COMT gene may perform better when training under pressure than those with the “Worrier” variety. I found I had a copy of each variant, and so fell somewhere between the two.

I also found I had two copies of a variant associated with increased potential for high muscle volume, which was nice. However, I was likely to have slower lactate removal, meaning I’m more likely to suffer from muscle fatigue. There was also a result for “Lean Body Mass”, which is total body weight minus fat. My lean body mass was not predicted “due to technical and biological reasons”, which I supposed meant that they hadn’t been able to find the relevant variants in my sample.

Results: Lifestyle & Ageing

This section covered nicotine and alcohol addiction, biological ageing, inflammation sensitivity, and my predicted sleep cycle.

I found I had a lower risk for nicotine addiction: something I’ve never struggled with. I had an average risk for alcohol addiction. I do drink alcohol, but addiction has never been a problem!

I wasn’t that pleased to see I was at risk for rapid ageing due to unfavourable variants in my TERC gene. It was recommended I avoid sunbathing and stressful situations, take food supplements containing “medicinal mushrooms” (what?), echinacea and royal jelly, eat ginger, garlic and onion, and consume plenty of antioxidants in order to protect my cells from ageing.

I found I had an average susceptibility to inflammation, which can be avoided by consuming antioxidants, fibre and omega-3.

According to my “Sleep Cycle” result, I’m neither a morning person nor a night person, but fall somewhere in between. According to one study, people with my version of the CLOCK gene reach peak performance approximately 6.3 hours after waking, which seemed like a very specific and possibly very short time period! There were tips on how to get better sleep and feel more awake, like keeping a regular sleep schedule, taking short naps if necessary, avoid sleeping in, and avoid unhealthy snacks.

Results: Cardiovascular Health

My results for cardiovascular health weren’t too alarming. I found I had average results for HDL (good) cholesterol, LDL (bad) cholesterol, triglycerides, blood sugar, insulin sensitivity and adiponectin. I found I had good omega-3 metabolism, though my result for “Omega-3 and Triglycerides” was orange, which I took to mean slightly unfavourable. They had been unable to find a result for “C-Reactive Protein” in my sample.

Apparently, it was my copy of the FADS1 gene that gave me good metabolism for omega -3, which I share with about 45% of the world population. However, I also have two unfavourable variants in my FADS1 gene, which mean that omega-3 does not have much effect in reducing triglycerides, a type of fat stored in the body.

I was curious to know what adiponectin was, and so I had a look at this result. I found it was a hormone that regulates certain metabolic processes, such as reducing appetite, enhancing the ability of muscles to use carbohydrates, and increasing the rate at which the body breaks down fats. I had two common variants in the ADPIOQ gene, and so my level was predicted to be average.

Results: Skin

The “Skin Rejuvenation” section covered skin antioxidant capacity, glycation protection, cellulite, skin hydration, skin elasticity, and stretch marks.

My results weren’t all that favourable. I found I had “slightly less efficient” antioxidant protection, and again it was recommended I consume plenty of antioxidants in order to help my skin detoxify (shown below).

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My result for "Skin Antioxidant Capacity".

My result for "Skin Antioxidant Capacity".

I also had poor glycation protection. I read that glycation was the process in which excess glucose binds to collagen and elastin fibres, causing damage and accelerating ageing. It was recommended I limit my sugar intake and try to incorporate foods with a high phenol content (such as ginger, cinnamon, cloves, rosemary, etc.), which inhibit glycation, as well as vitamins A, C and E, which can help to replenish collagen.

My results for cellulite and skin hydration were both average, while I had a higher genetic risk for losing skin elasticity and developing stretch marks – so plenty to look forward to.

The report ended in a series of appendices: “More on Analyses” (which explained more about BMI, vitamins, etc.), “Analysed Genes”, “Glossary”, “Nutrition Charts” (which were mentioned in several of my results, and broke down the exact amounts of micronutrients I’d need into very exact tables), and “Scientific Sources” (which provided a list of research papers).

Summary

GenePlanet’s ‘NutriFit Premium’ report was an incredibly comprehensive, well-researched and painstakingly referenced report. It covered basically all aspects of nutrition, fitness, skin health, and general wellness with genetic bases that are currently known, without touching on any of the “scarier” results you may find in a genetic health report (such as predispositions to cancer, Alzheimer’s or heart disease).

The report was beautifully presented, and each result was explained in detail, with yet more information included in the appendices, should I wish to seek it out. The only drawback to such a comprehensive and detailed report was the trouble of remembering the many recommendations contained within it. Anyone looking to use the report as a nutrition guide would definitely have to take notes!

See a description of this DNA test from Gene Planet >

At a Glance

Editor's Rating:
4.5 out of 5 stars
Customer Service:
5 out of 5 stars
Clarity of Results:
5 out of 5 stars
References Cited:
5 out of 5 stars
Value for Money:
4 out of 5 stars

Summary

The NutriFit test from Gene Planet is excellent. They have absolute confidence in their analysis and interpretation of your DNA, as demonstrated by the summary of genes analysed and the comprehensive scientific sources.

Although the nutritional charts are amazing, it was a shame that there weren’t any meal or training plans included in the report. This was the only aspect that I felt was missing.

This is one of the most expensive tests on the market but its excellent value for money, especially as you get a pre and post-test consultation with an expert. I highly recommend this test to anyone with a serious interest in acquiring and maintaining good health.

Full Review

About two years ago we took Gene Planet’s ‘Personal DNA Analysis’ and were dazzled to receive a beautiful booklet covering predisposition to disease, response to medications and genetically determined traits. This time we were offered a look at their ‘NutriFit’ test and were delighted to receive a second beautiful booklet! We were told it was chock full of recommendations tailored to my DNA, which would help me plan my optimal diet and live a healthy lifestyle…

Product Expectations

Gene Planet’s website said the NutriFit test would improve my health in the follow ways: I’d discover the micro and macro nutrients I need, learn about my metabolism and response to physical activity, and identify if I’ve inherited high cholesterol, high blood sugar, weak bones or a susceptibility to being overweight. I’d also be told how I metabolise alcohol, caffeine and lactose, if I’m prone to oxidative stress, and which sports activities are best suited to my muscle type.

Gene Planet would give me the results of 35 analyses covering 110 genetic variations, and nutritional tables covering 200 different foods to help me plan my diet. It was great to see such a specific description of the booklet I’d receive, and I was confident the test would help me live a healthier lifestyle. There was even a demo version of the booklet on the site to explore!

Gene Planet discussed the limitations of their test in their terms and conditions, so I knew the traits they'd report on would be likelihoods and not statistical certainties. It's a shame these limitations weren't easier to find on the site.

Ordering Experience

Using the Gene Planet website was a terrific experience – it was super easy to order the test and I received a saliva collection kit in the post after just two days.

It was great to see that the terms and conditions said I could contact Gene Planet before and after the test for a medical consultation about my results. An email address and phone number were provided and I have to say, knowing I could reach out to them was incredibly reassuring.

The terms also stated that my sample would be destroyed after testing, and there was no mention of Gene Planet using my sample or my results for research purposes, or selling it to a third party. In fact, the terms explicitly stated that they’d only use the data they acquire from my DNA to the extent that it was necessary to give me the results. I thought this was excellent as I know that other DNA testing companies sell your data after you take their test.

I had no trouble providing the saliva sample, but when it came to sending it back, I asked DHL (the company Gene Planet use to send and collect the sample) to bring a DHL envelope when they picked it up, just as Gene Planet instructed. However, DHL said their drivers do not carry DHL envelopes so I had to go to a DHL centre first to get the envelope before arranging the pick-up!

It was a shame that Gene Planet didn’t confirm that they’d received my sample, as I didn’t know they’d got it until I received an email to say my results were ready five weeks later!

Results

Five weeks after returning my samples, the results arrived in the post as a beautiful, 106-page glossy booklet.

The report was divided into 13 sections: ‘Results Summary', ‘The ABCs of genetics and diet’, ‘The way to your ideal body weight’, ‘Your gene’s influence on metabolism and health’, ‘The vitamins and minerals your body needs’, ‘Influences on your eating habits’, ‘The effectiveness of your metabolism’, ‘Your genes, detoxification and antioxidants’, ‘Your genes, sports and recreation’, ‘Addictions and ageing’, ‘Summary of genes analysed’, ‘Nutritional Charts’, and ‘Scientific Sources’.

The 'Results Summary' was fantastic! Every single genetic analysis had been listed, 33 in total, with my result shown alongside (e.g. lower risk, high sensitivity) with a one-sentence summary explaining the result and giving a recommendation. The summary gave me a superb snapshot of the results and what I should do about them.

The next section was titled 'The ABCs of genes & diet' and it contained a terrific explanation of DNA and why the genetic variations analysed determine the traits we inherit. There was a clear explanation of nutrigenetics – why our genes determine our ideal diet – and a simple yet thorough description of the principles of nutrition. Having read it, I fully understood why tailoring my diet and training plan to my genes would have a positive impact on my health.

Results Section: Your ideal body weight

This section revealed that I had a lower than average risk of being overweight, that I had the average response to saturated fats, monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats, but that I had a very unfavourable response to carbohydrates. This completely rings true with me, I’m slightly overweight – I just can’t give up carbs! – but whenever I’ve tried cutting out carbohydrates, I’ve experienced weight-loss, and at a much faster rate than when I don’t cut out carbs but exercise regularly. My results are shown below:

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The influence of diet on my bodyweight.

The influence of diet on my bodyweight.

A page was dedicated to each of the five analyses, and each page showed how my result compared to the average, the extent to which environmental (non-genetic) factors play a part, and recommendations for tailoring my diet were made – these referred the superb nutritional tables at the end of the report.

At the end of this section, I was told that I needed a ‘balanced diet with a controlled intake of carbohydrates’. Tables were provided to show the food groups I should include in my diet, my optimal daily calorie intake (according to the physical activity I’d undertake that day) and my recommended daily percentages of basic nutrients.

Results Section: Your genes' influence

This section revealed that I had an average response to HDL (good) cholesterol, LDL (bad) cholesterol, triglycerides and blood sugar. My results are shown below:

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Factors influencing my metabolism.

Factors influencing my metabolism.

A page was dedicated to each of the four analyses, and each page showed how my result compared to the average, the extent to which environmental (non-genetic) factors play a part, and recommendations for tailoring my diet were made – these referred the superb nutritional tables at the end of the report.

I was really happy with these results – as long as I don’t have a more unfavourable response than average, I see no reason to worry about these analyses!

Results Section: Vitamins and minerals

This section revealed that I’m likely to have a high level of Vitamin D and Potassium, an average level of Vitamin B6, Iron and that I’m likely to have the average bone density, but that I’m likely to suffer with low levels of Vitamin B9, Vitamin B12 and salt. My results are shown below:

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My requirement for nutrients.

My requirement for nutrients.

A page was dedicated to each of the eight analyses, and each page explained why these vitamins and minerals were important, and made recommendations for tailoring my diet – these referred the superb nutritional tables at the end of the report.

I was fascinated to learn about the deficiencies I’m likely to be suffering with. I was impressed that Gene Plant explained which foods I should eat to get these nutrients, and that they only recommended vitamin supplements on the back of my bone density result (calcium, magnesium, manganese, Vitamin K).

Results Section: Your eating habits

This section revealed that I have a lower than average propensity to choose sweet foods (I’ve not found this to be the case!), a lower likelihood of feeling unsatisfied after a meal, that I find the taste of sugar less intensive than average, and that the taste of salt is of average intensity for me. My results are shown below:

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My eating habits.

My eating habits.

A page was dedicated to each of the four analyses, and each page explained why the genetic variations I carried produced these traits. There was solid advice against each analysis for combatting the negative effects of these traits. I was particularly interested in the advice for ‘Consumption of sweet treats’ which said brushing my teeth would help me fight an overwhelming urge for sugar (I’ve found this to be true!), that I should pick fruit when I want something sweet (hard to do but I’ve found this helps), and that rice waffles covered in honey or yogurt are a great substitute for chocolate bars and the like. Unfortunately, I detest rice waffles so I won’t be taking this advice!

Results Section: Your metabolism

This section revealed that I metabolise alcohol, caffeine and lactose quickly and effectively. Great news as I love all three!

A page was dedicated to each of the three analyses, and each page explained why the genetic variations I carried produced these traits. There were also recommendations for mitigating the negative effects of caffeine, alcohol and lactose, but I didn’t pay much attention as my DNA seems so well-equipped to deal with them!

Results Section: Your genes, detoxification and antioxidants

This section revealed that I’m predisposed to low levels of selenium, average levels of Vitamin E, and that I experience an unfavourable response to oxidative stress.

A page was dedicated to each of the three analyses, and each page explained why the genetic variations I carried produced these traits, and gave recommendations for mitigating the negative effects.

My selenium result is shown below:

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My selenium result.

My selenium result.

This result was worrying as I know selenium’s an important anti-oxidant. From previous DNA tests I know I have a high predisposition toward prostate cancer, and I’ve been recommended selenium supplements before so this result is no surprise.

Results Section: Genes & sport

This section revealed that I’m predisposed to greater muscle endurance, that I’d find strength training moderately beneficial for weight-loss, and that I have a low tendency to injury (which I haven’t found to be the case!).

A page was dedicated to each of the three analyses, and each page explained why the genetic variations I carried produced these traits, and gave recommendations for mitigating the negative effects.

Results Section: Addictions and ageing

This section revealed that I have the average predisposition to nicotine addiction, a lower than average predisposition to alcohol addiction, but that I’m predisposed to faster than average biological ageing.

The nicotine and alcohol results weren’t news to me, I drink and smoke from time to time but am able to stop for years at a time if I choose. The biological ageing result was disappointing, especially it’s been said that I’m vain!

A page was dedicated to each of the three analyses, and each page explained why the genetic variations I carried produced these traits, and gave recommendations for mitigating the negative effects.

The biological ageing section recommended that I try to stay out of the sun (which I do already), that I use sunscreen, that I make sure I get plenty of sleep, and that I eat zucchinis for the beta-carotene they contain – apparently this slows down biological ageing and has anti-carcinogenic effects!

At the end of the booklet I was presented with a summary which was especially impressive. Each of the 105 genes analysed was listed, the reason for the analysis, the role of the gene, and my particular genetic variation was shown alongside. This is a mind-blowing resource as I’m able to Google any analysis I wanted to learn more about, and check Gene Planet’s interpretation of my result if I wished.

Summary

The NutriFit test from Gene Planet is excellent. They have absolute confidence in their analysis and interpretation of your DNA, as demonstrated by the summary of genes analysed and the comprehensive scientific sources.

Although the nutritional charts are amazing, it was a shame that there weren’t any meal or training plans included in the report. This was the only aspect that I felt was missing.

This is one of the most expensive tests on the market but its excellent value for money, especially as you get a pre and post-test consultation with an expert. I highly recommend this test to anyone with a serious interest in acquiring and maintaining good health.

Please note that we were invited to take this test free of charge.

See a description of this DNA test from Gene Planet >

At a Glance

Editor's Rating:
4.5 out of 5 stars
Customer Service:
5 out of 5 stars
Clarity of Results:
5 out of 5 stars
References Cited:
5 out of 5 stars
Value for Money:
4 out of 5 stars

Summary

Overall, the ‘Personal genetic analysis’ from Gene Planet was very high quality. The results were comprehensively explained, contained lots of practical advice, and clearly referenced all the supporting studies.

Although the test’s limitations for each disease are outlined in the results, I felt the website suggested measures could be taken for reducing ALL disease risks, when I know this isn’t possible for Alzheimer’s. I'd like to see Gene Planet do more to make sure people aren't misled before they buy.

That said, there’s no doubt this is one of the best tests on the market despite being one of the most expensive.

Full Review

Gene Planet were offering a ‘Personal genetic analysis’ which would test for my genetically determined disease risks, medication responses, and a number of physical traits. I decided to give it a go…

Product Expectations

Their site said the personal genetic analysis would tell me my genetic predisposition to 20 diseases, and suggest ways to reduce the risk for each. I’d be shown my genetically determined responses to six medications, and learn if the dosages need be tailored to my DNA (in the event I’m ever prescribed them). I’d even be presented with 14 of my inherited traits, including my likelihood of baldness and sensitivity to nicotine addiction! It was great to see that example results had been provided on the site so I knew what to expect.

Ordering Experience

The order form required a lot of information but I was able to purchase the test without any problems. I received the kit after two working days via DHL, and sent my saliva samples off to their lab. One working day later they told me they’d received the samples, and my results arrived in the post five and a half weeks after that.

The Results

The results came in a custom-made hardback book which contained over 100 pages! The introduction said that over 150 regions of my genome had been tested for the 38 analyses in the book. It was made clear that the results were not diagnoses, and that I should consult my doctor if the recommended lifestyle changes were significant. I was reassured to read that Gene Planet’s recommendations follow the guidelines laid out by the Human Genetics Commission, a UK advisory body.

The book had been split into several sections: A results summary, genetic facts, a guide to using the book, my genetic disease risks, my response to medications, my genetically determined traits, my analysed genes, and scientific sources.

Results Section: Results Summary

The summary listed 19 diseases. Each had a green, orange or red icon alongside, to indicate whether my risk was decreased, average or increased. I was startled to discover I had an increased risk of suffering with six diseases (atrial fibrillation, coeliac disease, glaucoma, type 2 diabetes, lung cancer and colorectal cancer), but a short paragraph by each reassured me there were preventative measures I could take. A summary of my genetic risk factors for developing four of the 19 diseases (cancers) is shown below.

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A summary of my genetic risk factors for developing cancer.

A summary of my genetic risk factors for developing cancer.

The analysis of my six medication responses and 14 traits had also been summarised, with coloured icons to signify the findings, and the reasons why my genes were responsible for each result. A summary of nine of my 14 genetically determined physical features and traits is shown below.

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A summary of nine of my 14 genetically determined physical features and traits.

A summary of nine of my 14 genetically determined physical features and traits.

Results Section: Genetic Facts

The genetic facts section contained statistics, an explanation of DNA, and told me why mutations are important. The limitations of the test were also discussed in more detail, which helped me understand why my genes don’t tell the whole story.

Results Section: My Genetic Disease Risks

Most of the book was dedicated to my genetic disease risks. For each of the 19 diseases that were reported on, two pages covered general disease information, my risk summary, my percentage lifetime risk, the average lifetime risk, the influence that genes have vs. the environment for that condition, a medical advice section, and a prevention and therapy section.

The glaucoma result was of particular interest as my eyesight has always been poor. Each result was summarised in a central section and my glaucoma result is shown below.

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My glaucoma result.

My glaucoma result.

I was told I had a ‘slightly increased risk’ and that my lifetime risk was 5.33% vs. the average risk of 4%. It was interesting to read that our genes only influence 15% of glaucoma risk, and the environment influences 85%. I was advised to have eye tests every two years after the age of forty, and if ‘elevated intraocular pressure’ is detected (one of the main risk factors for glaucoma); then drugs can be used to lower it to prevent (or treat) the condition. If drug therapy fails, I learned that surgical and laser procedures could also be undertaken.

Results Section: My Response to Medications

For each of my six medication responses, a page provided a thorough explanation of what each drug did, my response summary, why genes change the medication’s effectiveness, and a list of the other names they’re known by. I saw that three medications would be less effective for me, one of these being ‘metformin’ which is used to regulate blood glucose levels (my metformin result is shown below).

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My metformin result.

My metformin result.

Results Section: My Genetically Determined Traits

For each of the 14 traits reported on, a page described the physical characteristic in more detail, whether there were any positive or negative effects associated, the genetic and environmental factors linked to that trait, and how my genes influenced the result.

I was relieved to see I had a low likelihood of developing baldness (my baldness result is shown below). My AR gene and genetic region between genes PAX1 and FOX indicate I’m three times less prone to this trait than average.

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My baldness result.

My baldness result.

Summary

Overall, the ‘Personal genetic analysis’ from Gene Planet was very high quality. The results were comprehensively explained, contained lots of practical advice, and clearly referenced all the supporting studies.

Although the test’s limitations for each disease are outlined in the results, I felt the website suggested measures could be taken for reducing ALL disease risks, when I know this isn’t possible for Alzheimer’s. I'd like to see Gene Planet do more to make sure people aren't misled before they buy.

That said, there’s no doubt this is one of the best tests on the market despite being one of the most expensive.

See a description of this DNA test from Gene Planet >