Health Testing Reviews for Silverberry Genomix

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At a Glance

Editor's Rating:
4 out of 5 stars
Customer Service:
4.5 out of 5 stars
Clarity of Results:
4 out of 5 stars
References Cited:
3.5 out of 5 stars
Value for Money:
5 out of 5 stars

Summary

The ‘Basic Wellness’ report by Silverberry Genomix provided an interesting introduction to my genetic health. I found the reports for nutrition, exercise, skills and aptitudes, and potential sensitivities interesting, and was pleased tips to improve my health and lifestyle had been included, as well as anecdotal information about the studies behind the results. If I were to purchase their comprehensive report, I would hope it would contain much more information!

Full Review

Silverberry Genomix is a DNA lifestyle company based in San Francisco, California. The company uses algorithms to assess genetic data and generate health and wellness information that can help optimise fitness plans and prompt positive lifestyle changes.

Their genetic health apps can be purchased through Sequencing, an online marketplace for genomic applications. Here, I found many apps belonging to Silverberry Genomix, Lifenome, and Sequencing’s own brands.

Product Expectations

I could browse the Sequencing marketplace on my computer, and was allowed to view the mobile and web apps they offered without logging in. If I wanted to make a purchase, I would first have to create an account, and upload my genetic data.

The Sequencing site was sleek and modern. I saw they offered apps for healthcare professionals, developers and researchers, as well as individuals and families. I read that their DNA-powered apps were compatible with data “from all genetic tests”.

Among the apps by Silverberry Genomix was ‘Basic Wellness’. In the summary information, I read that the web app would analyse my DNA to give insights into exercise benefit, nutrition, skincare, allergy information, and “personality development”.

I could also view a sample report, which was in the form of a PDF.

Ordering Experience

To access the web app, it was necessary to register for a free Sequencing account. I could create an account using my email address, or log in with an AncestryDNA, 23andMe, Google, Facebook or GitHub account. I decided to create a fresh account before uploading my genetic data. I had only to enter my email address (no name, age, or any other personal details), and was immediately sent a verification email.

Before creating my account, I had a look through the company’s various terms and conditions and other policies. Among these, I read that my personal information wouldn’t be disclosed to third parties without my consent, that some cookies were used for marketing purposes, that any information given was not medically verified, and that they had a liberal refund policy allowing refunds for up to 30 days after purchase.

After verifying my email, I was asked whether I was an individual or family, app developer, researcher, etc. I was then asked for a first name and password.

The next step was uploading my data.

Data Upload

I could upload my genetic data directly from my computer, connect to an AncestryDNA or 23andMe account, import my data from a cloud (such as Google Drive), or upload a “large file” (which you might have if you had your whole genome sequenced).

Once I had uploaded my data, I was gifted with a free ‘Athletic Performance’ app. I could view the time my upload was taking in a progress bar.

While I waited for my data to upload, I was able to purchase the apps in the Sequencing store. I went and added ‘Basic Wellness’ to my apps.

Though at the time the web app was free, I had to give my credit/debit card credentials in order to download it, since it was only free for a limited time.

The Results

Before starting the app, I was asked for a little information. I had to select the genetic data file I wished to use, and give my gender, age and ethnicity. I then had to wait a few minutes for the application to process my information.

Clicking “View Results” redirected me to the Silverberry Genomix website. I read that a Silverberry Genomix account had been created for me using the email I’d given to Sequencing.com, though I needed to create a new password.

My Basic Wellness reports had been divided into “Nutritional Habits”, “Exercise Benefits”, “Skills and Aptitudes”, and “Other Sensitivities”.

Results Section: Nutritional Habits

Clicking on Nutritional Habits, I saw that I had only been given one sample report, which was for “Mediterranean Diet Effectiveness”. At first I was a little disappointed: though the app was free, I had expected a little more than this.

However, I saw I could expand the information given, and there was quite a lot of it.

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A snippet from my Mediterranean Diet Effectiveness result.

A snippet from my Mediterranean Diet Effectiveness result.

I read that my genetics did not make me any more predisposed to benefit from a Mediterranean diet than the average person. However, I could still gain health benefits from such a diet.

There was information about the Mediterranean diet, and how it can be used to lower cholesterol, and has been associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality, reduced overall mortality, and a lesser likelihood of developing cancer, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

Apparently, a Mediterranean diet involved “consuming 35% of daily calories from fats, including up to 22% from monounsaturated fats, 20% of good quality proteins from fish and meats, and up to 40% of carbohydrates”. There were also links to Mediterranean-style recipes on Mayo Clinic.

I was given the rsIDs of the two variants they had analysed in my genome, and links to read more about them. However, I was not told what my actual genotypes were.

Results Section: Exercise Benefits

My report for Exercise Benefits covered “Overall Fitness Benefits”. I was deemed to have “Typical” overall fitness benefits, as my “overall predisposition score” was lower than 30% of the population. This made me wonder where I fitted into the remaining 70% of the population – was I equally averagely disposed, or did I gain more overall benefits than some of them?

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A snippet from my Overall Fitness Benefits result.

A snippet from my Overall Fitness Benefits result.

In the information, I read that I may not see quick benefits from moderate exercise on my health, particularly if I suffered from cholesterol, triglyceride or hypertension issues. In order to achieve benefits from exercise, I may need to boost exercise frequency and intensity along with eating a healthy diet. They recommended regular exercise of 45 minutes a day along with a healthy diet to improve vitals.

I couldn’t really argue with this result – I know that if I allow my fitness to slip it can take a while to build it back up!

Results Section: Skills and Aptitudes

The sample report for the Skills and Aptitudes section was “Reading Aptitude”, for which my result was, again, typical. I read that my genetic aptitude for reading was lower than 42.5% of the population, which was – well – humbling. As with all Silverberry’s results, there was a “Nature vs. Nurture” disclaimer at the bottom, just in case you were mortally offended by your result. In the information I read that “The more you read, the more you develop the neural pathways that make reading both pleasurable and easy.” Fair enough.

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A snippet from my Reading Aptitude result.

A snippet from my Reading Aptitude result.

I read that although there are environmental and social components that affect reading ability, studies have also shown that genetics and heredity also play a major role in the ability of people to process written language. Interestingly, some genetic variants linked to reading aptitude also contributed to mathematical ability.

Results Section: Other Sensitivities

My sample report for the Other Sensitivities section was “Seasonality”, and analysed how my genetics affected my predisposition for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), generally associated with low mood during winter.

I found that my predisposition score was lower than 20% of the population, making it statistically unlikely that I would develop SAD.

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A snippet from my Seasonality result.

A snippet from my Seasonality result.

In the information, I read that studies of over 4000 individuals of Australian and Amish descent had identified several genetic variants associated with SAD. In order to avoid developing seasonal depression, it was recommended to increase activity levels during winter months, and to monitor how my mood changes with the seasons and to make a note of it in case I suspect I have SAD.

Summary

The ‘Basic Wellness’ report by Silverberry Genomix provided an interesting introduction to my genetic health. I found the reports for nutrition, exercise, skills and aptitudes, and potential sensitivities interesting, and was pleased tips to improve my health and lifestyle had been included, as well as anecdotal information about the studies behind the results. If I were to purchase their comprehensive report, I would hope it would contain much more information!

See a description of this DNA test from Silverberry Genomix >